Robbed at Gunpoint

Robbed at Gunpoint

By Sheryl McAlister

My first emotion was not fear. In hindsight, that surprises me.  Shocks me, actually.

The kid pointed a gun inches away from my head. The gun was close enough and big enough to stop my initial instincts to fight back. I held my hands up, leaned as far back as I could from him as if to indicate I would not interfere.

I had just gotten into my car, which was parked outside my home in the city’s suburbs. I was on my way to work and took less than a minute to enable my phone to hands free. I hadn’t yet cranked the car, so the doors didn’t lock automatically. I heard the passenger door handle move before I saw the guy. He stuck his head and his upper torso inside my car.

My initial thought was WTF, dude?!?

I yelled “Noooo!!!”

He put a hand on my bag. I yelled “No” again.

Then slowly, with his right hand, he pulled a gun from his right side. He stared directly at me. And he didn’t say a word.

He didn’t seem to have mean eyes or menacing eyes or drug addict eyes. He was pretty young. Had a nice haircut, clean clothes. He wore a black t-shirt. But my fight instincts were no match for the gun that would surely have killed me if he had chosen to pull the trigger.

I backed up in my driver’s side seat against the car door. There was nowhere to run. He backed out of the car, with the gun still pointed at me. He took the bag and ran toward the truck that was apparently idling behind my car.

As he fishtailed out of the parking lot, I jumped out and snapped pictures of the truck and the license plate.

I then called 9-1-1. Police came quickly, dusted for fingerprints and took copies of my pictures. We found out the license plate had been stolen. No surprise there.

Adrenaline fueled me throughout the day as I went about dismantling bank accounts and credit cards and re-keying locks. A total waste of what started out to be a perfectly good day.

How I felt was interesting, and not something that was remotely familiar to me. I was surprised that my first instinct wasn’t fear. It is now. And that pisses me off. I am furious this ass-hat decided to hold a gun to my head so he could take my stuff.

My head. My stuff.

How is it fair that he can walk around with a gun, scope out a person to use it on, take that person’s stuff and take off in what’s probably a stolen car? With no consequences.

On one hand, I am grateful for the quick response, professionalism and compassion by the local police. And while I am certainly grateful this kid didn’t pull the trigger, I’m furious he robbed me in the first place.

I hope they find this guy and throw his ass in prison.

Copyright 2020 ©Sheryl McAlister

 

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14 Comments

  1. Oh no! This is awful!

    Reply

  2. OMG, Sheryl! I am so sorry this happened to you, but so thankful that you are OK. Not a good way to start the day for sure….but a good way to end it: pissed, but alive. So glad your good sense prevailed and you didn’t attempt to whip his ass – which is what he deserves. By someone. But.Not.By.You.

    Reply

  3. Oh my goodness my friend
    So glad you are safe

    Reply

  4. Sherri,
    So very sorry that you had to experience this. So very grateful: that you had the good sense to survive it; that you are emotionally equipped to evaluate your feelings; that you have the intellect to consider the situation and the ability and willingness to communicate it to the rest of us.
    Reminded of the question that occurred to me election night 2016 and every news day since: how can we have come to this? How can we believe that fear and guns can protect us from the consequences of our unjust society. Some of us have so much. Some have so little that even with no malice or meanness or drugged numbness we believe that we can take from others. Their stuff. Their heads.
    The world would be a bleaker place without you. With love and prayers!

    Reply

    1. Anne…. you always have a beautiful way with words. Much, much love to you and Jeannie.

      Reply

  5. Margie Tillotson February 6, 2020 at 9:39 am

    So sorry this happened to you………It happens too often and I am very glad you were not hurt…….

    On Wed, Feb 5, 2020 at 10:17 PM OldBroad & NewTrix wrote:

    > Sheryl McAlister posted: “Robbed at Gunpoint By Sheryl McAlister My first > emotion was not fear. In hindsight, that surprises me. Shocks me, > actually. The kid pointed a gun inches away from my head. The gun was close > enough and big enough to stop my initial instincts to fight bac” >

    Reply

  6. Oh my gosh, Sherry. So glad you weren’t hurt or worse. I would have been so mad(and scared) if this happened to me. Stay safe in this crazy world!

    Frances

    Reply

  7. I am horrified that this happened to you! Unfortunately, my experience is that “if” they catch him, very little, if any, consequences will be enforced. The fact that this happened in broad daylight with people coming and going in the area, makes it that much more frightening.

    Reply

  8. Ernest A Kastner Jr February 6, 2020 at 1:16 pm

    Sorry you had to go though this. You handled the situation like the champion you are. Please talk to a trusted friend or advisor to get this fear away from you. As Harry Chapin said in one of my favorite songs. After all these years, I still remember you. I learned the real value of true friendship from you.

    Reply

    1. Ernie! You made me cry…. I love you still.

      Let’s have a Greenville News reunion!!!!

      Reply

  9. Delores Shabazz February 6, 2020 at 3:08 pm

    Hi Professor McAlister. I am so sorry to hear this happened to you and am grateful you were not harmed. A bummer of a way to start your day. I can understand the anger and frustration you are feeling, because at that point, there was little you could do. I hope the armed thief is found quickly before he twitches and really hurts someone. You stay safe out there.

    Reply

    1. Thank you, Delores! Hope you are well!!

      Reply

  10. Awful!

    On Wed, Feb 5, 2020 at 10:17 PM OldBroad & NewTrix wrote:

    > Sheryl McAlister posted: “Robbed at Gunpoint By Sheryl McAlister My first > emotion was not fear. In hindsight, that surprises me. Shocks me, > actually. The kid pointed a gun inches away from my head. The gun was close > enough and big enough to stop my initial instincts to fight bac” >

    Reply

  11. Barbara Gelberd February 9, 2020 at 2:56 pm

    Just seeing this now (no internet for 3 days) and stunned. In your in your neighborhood!?? I agree with who ever said make sure you talk to someone trained to help you offload this trauma. So sorry you had to experience this horror.

    Reply

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